Yard and Garden

Yard and Garden

Creek behind a houseSilicon Valley has a bad case of “urban sprawl”, unfortunately, but there are places in San Jose and nearby where creeks meander through neighborhoods, offering a little extra space between back neighbors.  This extra breathing room is valued by homeowners with a creekside location.  They often cite the pleasantly rural sounds of frogs and birds as an added bonus.

But some home buyers are a little spooked.  Are there risks with buying real estate next to a waterway?  Would the home flood in heavy rains?  Is there an excess of unpleasant wildlife to worry about?  One of my buyer clients was concerned that burglers would use the creek’s access path to steal things and get away unseen.   Another was afraid of cougars or bobcats or other unwelcome visitors coming in from a creek or tributary.

When Jim and I were newlyweds, we lived in a townhouse on Neary’s Lagoon in Santa Cruz (a bird sanctuary) and I have sold several homes along creeks or ponds, so will make some comments based on my experience.

Creeks: scenic or not?

In general, I would say that being next to or near a creek most often will improve the value of the home because creeks are scenic and also provide a space buffer between rear neighbors.  They frequently have beautiful old trees framing their banks and are slightly curved, too, so these are usually quite pretty.   I won’t say that living next to a waterway which looks like a Los Angeles flood control channel would be beautiful or enhance a home’s value much, though the space between neighbors would still be appreciated.  Each case must be judged on its own merits.

Wildlife at the water’s edge

It is true that there will be more wildlife near water, whether it’s a creek, river, reservoir, pond, or percolation pond.  Birds, reptiles and animals need water and will seek it out.  If you love nature, you may welcome the sound of frogs and geese, and perhaps secretly hope to see a wayward deer!  If you decide to live near water, it is very important to make sure that wildlife cannot enter your home (chimney, attic and crawlspace included) and it will require some ongoing dillengence to keep them out because they will be drawn to the water over and over again.  I’ve known people adjacent to water to have some challenges with birds, bats, mice, rats, and other creatures trying to make their way in.  But that can happen anywhere.  At our current home, which is not next to or near a creek, we had a squirrel try to claw its way through flashing on our roof to get into the attic. Another time we had a possum or racoon get into the attic. Be clear that being away from the water doesn’t mean “no wildlife issues” – but if you are next to water, you will probably face them a little more often.

Floods and flood plains

Creekside locations do not all flood; this is perhaps the biggest misconception.  When buying a home, you can check the flood plain status via the Natural Hazards Disclosure Report, which the seller provides.  And please know that there are different types and levels of flood plains – they are not all the same!  The one which requires flood insurance is called a 100 Year Flood Plain and in those locations, water of up to 1 foot may be expecte d once every 100 years (so not that often).  There are 500 year flood plains and areas which are “dam failure inundation” zones (if a dam were to break, water downhill would flood, of course).

Protected species that depend on the waterways

We have a number of protected species in California, including certain frogs and salamanders.  If your home (or the one you want to buy) is in the habitat area of those animals, birds, or reptiles, you may have some constraints on landscaping near the creek or water.  Most of the time it involves not placing a fence within so many feet of the creek and using only native landscaping in that area close to the creek too.

Crime?

As for crime, I would have to say that you want to always check a site like CrimeReports.com or similar sources to know what’s happening.  We do have crime everywhere, and all kinds, to varying degrees.  Most creeks do not have easy access to people’s homes or yards, and often the service road along the creek is a rough gravel, so I have a hard time picturing burglers trying to get in and walk their stolen loot a ways down that path.  But check the reports.  Realtors are not crime experts and we cannot make promises about any area or location.

Check out market activity in Santa Clara County:

  1. 4 beds, 2 full, 1 half baths
    Home size: 1,856 sq ft
    Lot size: 6,664 sqft
  2. 4 beds, 2 full, 1 half baths
    Home size: 2,113 sq ft
    Lot size: 7,187 sqft
  3. 4 beds, 2 full baths
    Home size: 1,764 sq ft
    Lot size: 7,013 sqft
  4. 3 beds, 1 full, 1 half baths
    Home size: 1,260 sq ft
    Lot size: 8,842 sqft
  5. 4 beds, 2 full baths
    Home size: 1,395 sq ft
    Lot size: 5,009 sqft

See all Real estate matching your search.
(all data current as of 5/28/2017)

Listing information deemed reliable but not guaranteed. Read full disclaimer.

And in Santa Cruz County:

  1. 2 beds, 2 full baths
    Home size: 1,171 sq ft
    Lot size: 1,176 sqft
  2. 2 beds, 1 full bath
    Home size: 1,400 sq ft
    Lot size: 3,223 sqft
  3. 3 beds, 2 full, 1 half baths
    Home size: 1,782 sq ft
    Lot size: 1,176 sqft
  4. 4 beds, 3 full baths
    Home size: 1,948 sq ft
    Lot size: 10,018 sqft
  5. 2 beds, 2 full, 1 half baths
    Home size: 1,220 sq ft
    Lot size: 1,045 sqft

See all Real estate matching your search.
(all data current as of 5/28/2017)

Listing information deemed reliable but not guaranteed. Read full disclaimer.

ToadstoolsLawn mushrooms are the bane of gardeners everywhere; we usually refer to these unwanted pests as toadstools.  Toadstools are really the same thing as mushrooms but are often not edible and are poisonous – so we think of toadstools as bad but mushrooms as food.  These members of the fungus family pop up when we get a little moisture, so they are a common sight once a little rain appears, as it just did last week.   They are not harmful if left alone, but people with pets and children may be concerned about these unwanted visitors being ingested, causing sickness or death – so for that reason, it may be advisable to rid your yard of them.

These fungi thrive on decomposing plant matter, whether it’s old roots, sawdust, animal droppings, or a fallen log. Some of the suggested treatments involve getting rid of what they are feeding on. (Remove scat or pet poop.) If that’s not practical, for instance if there’s loads of sawdust under your lawn, neutralizing it with soapy water after aerating the area or apply nitrogen fertilizer or something similar to help.

Do wear gloves when handling them directly Do rake or mow the toadstools to remove them.  Want more info?  Here are a few articles to help:

http://www.weekendgardener.net/plant-diseases/mushrooms-090809.htm

Mushrooms and Other Nuisance Fungi in Lawns (University of California)

  1. 3 beds, 2 full baths
    Home size: 1,510 sq ft
    Lot size: 8,363 sqft
  2. 3 beds, 2 full, 1 half baths
    Home size: 2,357 sq ft
    Lot size: 4.99 ac
  3. 5 beds, 4 full baths
    Home size: 4,100 sq ft
    Lot size: 7,492 sqft
  4. 5 beds, 4 full baths
    Home size: 3,142 sq ft
    Lot size: 7,405 sqft
  5. 3 beds, 3 full baths
    Home size: 3,208 sq ft
    Lot size: 29,620 sqft
  6. 2 beds, 1 full bath
    Home size: 574 sq ft
    Lot size: 2.89 ac
  7. 4 beds, 3 full baths
    Home size: 3,270 sq ft
    Lot size: 6.13 ac
  8. 2 beds, 1 full bath
    Home size: 1,086 sq ft
    Lot size: 8,799 sqft
  9. 2 beds, 1 full bath
    Home size: 954 sq ft
    Lot size: 10,541 sqft
  10. 2 beds, 2 full, 1 half baths
    Home size: 1,251 sq ft
    Lot size: 2,787 sqft

See all Real estate in the city of Los Gatos.
(all data current as of 5/28/2017)

Listing information deemed reliable but not guaranteed. Read full disclaimer.

waterfallFor four years we have worried about the lack of rain and increased our conservation efforts.  Today lawns everywhere are dead, or hanging on by a thread.

Weather experts now say that there’s a 90% chance of an El Niño winter ahead.  Not only that, but they expect it to be a doozy.

My suspicion is that most of us are not really ready for all that water and the flooding that may ensue, so I wanted to suggest a little preparation for the rainy season (and the deepest hopes that it will refill our reservoirs and aquafers).   Here are a few suggestions from me, based on decades of attending home inspections:

  1. If it’s been more than 3 years since your roof was inspected, get a roof inspection done now, during the dry season. (Use a licensed roofing contractor to do it, not a handyman.) It’s better to do it before you discover a leak, and it’s better to do it before the roofers are booked out a few weeks!  The cost is probably going to be around $100 – $150.  Most homes need “tune up” work every few years, and that’s normal, so have the inspection understanding that some of your vent pipes may need resealing, a few shingles may need replacing, or other small items may require adjustment or repair.  If the roof is younger, that’s all it should be.  The old adage that “an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure” applies here.
  2. Make sure that the grading around your house or townhouse is correct and that the land slopes toward the yard & away from your home.  Grading is incorrect a lot of the time – I probably see my home inspector write that up more than half the time.  It matters because the water that comes down will follow the slope of the soil and you do not want it aimed at your structure.  You want the water to go away from your home.
  3. Your downspouts should direct the water away from the house, ideally 6′ or more.  This is super important, as the entire surface of your roof collects water and pushes it off through just a few openings, and in heavy rains this is a ton of water!  You do not want it lingering near your foundation because our clay soils are expansive when wet and that puts unfriendly pressure on foundations and may cause cracking and the exposure of the rebar inside to moisture.  That rebar is important for the foundation’s strength, and if it rusts, the integrity of the foundation is at risk.  So protect the whole system by getting the water away from the home.
  4. If you have a drainage system, make sure that the grates over it are cleared of leaves to allow the water to filter into it.
  5. If you have a sump pump, consider upgrading from the standard type that operates on electricity only to one that works with a battery backup.  In really big storms, we can lose power and then the regular sump pump won’t work, just when you need it most!  If you already have a battery backup, consider keeping a replacement battery on hand.
  6. Most Silicon Valley homes have power lines rather than underground utilities.  Have a look at yours, if applicable, and see if there are tree branches too close to the lines.  Often P, G & E will trim them for free if you spot a problem and let them know.
  7. Do keep spare batteries, water, food, medicines, and other essentials on hand in case of a prolonged power outage.  I recommend getting cell phone or other electronic device battery backups.  Again, if you’re out of power for 3 days, you may need something to juice up your mobile phone!  I have a couple of these “bricks” but my favorite is called a PowerStrip and it has a solar charger.
  8. If you are in an area which is heavily wooded, or the access to your home is heavily wooded, consider purchasing power tools to clear trees that may fall on your route.  Being able to get in and out is crucial in case of an emergency.

Due to an avalanche of spam comments, I have had to turn off comments on this blog, but if you think I have missed anything, please email me and I will edit this article to help others be better prepared for the rains that we hope and pray are coming soon.

  1. 3 beds, 2 full baths
    Home size: 1,510 sq ft
    Lot size: 8,363 sqft
  2. 3 beds, 2 full, 1 half baths
    Home size: 2,357 sq ft
    Lot size: 4.99 ac
  3. 5 beds, 4 full baths
    Home size: 4,100 sq ft
    Lot size: 7,492 sqft
  4. 5 beds, 4 full baths
    Home size: 3,142 sq ft
    Lot size: 7,405 sqft
  5. 3 beds, 3 full baths
    Home size: 3,208 sq ft
    Lot size: 29,620 sqft
  6. 2 beds, 1 full bath
    Home size: 574 sq ft
    Lot size: 2.89 ac
  7. 4 beds, 3 full baths
    Home size: 3,270 sq ft
    Lot size: 6.13 ac
  8. 2 beds, 1 full bath
    Home size: 1,086 sq ft
    Lot size: 8,799 sqft
  9. 2 beds, 1 full bath
    Home size: 954 sq ft
    Lot size: 10,541 sqft
  10. 2 beds, 2 full, 1 half baths
    Home size: 1,251 sq ft
    Lot size: 2,787 sqft

See all Real estate in the city of Los Gatos.
(all data current as of 5/28/2017)

Listing information deemed reliable but not guaranteed. Read full disclaimer.

Waste no waterThe drought is ongoing, and the state and the Santa Clara Valley Water District are both pressing all of us for greater conservation.  Silicon Valley residents will be tempted by local water agencies (and PG & E) offering some pretty tempting rebates, some of which have been recently and temporarily increased, for improvements made to your home and yard which lessen the amount of wasted water. For instance, changing toilets and faucets to “low flow” models will net consumers a little cash back. But it’s much more than that.  How about getting your washing machine’s gray water to a second use in the yard?

Some of these updates may not be optional in the future, so consider getting them while the rebates are still available.

Please click on the link below to view the available programs:

http://www.valleywater.org/programs/rebates.aspx

San Jose Water Company’s rebate page: https://www.sjwater.com/for_your_information/save_water_money/rebates_incentives

Also, view the SCVWD “Fact Sheet” for more info on what’s happening with our water. (This is a pdf on the Town of Los Gatos website).

  1. 5 beds, 3 full, 1 half baths
    Home size: 6,489 sq ft
    Lot size: 29.54 ac
  2. 7 beds, 8 full, 3 half baths
    Home size: 9,906 sq ft
    Lot size: 20.43 ac
  3. 6 beds, 8 full, 2 half baths
    Home size: 10,489 sq ft
    Lot size: 16.10 ac
  4. 4 beds, 4 full baths
    Home size: 4,577 sq ft
    Lot size: 10.14 ac
  5. 4 beds, 4 full, 1 half baths
    Home size: 3,844 sq ft
    Lot size: 9.93 ac
  6. 4 beds, 3 full, 1 half baths
    Home size: 2,780 sq ft
    Lot size: 9.92 ac
  7. 2 beds, 3 full baths
    Home size: 2,190 sq ft
    Lot size: 8.51 ac
  8. 3 beds, 2 full baths
    Home size: 2,500 sq ft
    Lot size: 8.15 ac
  9. 2 beds, 1 full, 1 half baths
    Home size: 1,278 sq ft
    Lot size: 6.88 ac
  10. 4 beds, 4 full baths
    Home size: 2,845 sq ft
    Lot size: 6.54 ac

See all Real estate in the city of Los Gatos.
(all data current as of 5/28/2017)

Listing information deemed reliable but not guaranteed. Read full disclaimer.

The State of California is in the 3rd year of a serious drought.  There are areas in CA where there is no water going to homes at all unless it’s being trucked in (at a very high cost).  We are all being asked to conserve as much as possible, with 20% being targeted not just in Silicon Valley but in all areas of California.  How are your conservation efforts coming?  Do you know how to check your water usage as compared to a year ago?

If you have San Jose Water, you won’t need to dig into your 2013 water bills to see how you’re progressing with water savings.  The San Jose Water statement comes with a great breakdown so you can see if you’re cutting back as much as you think.   Here’s an example:

water bill historical usage

What’s nice is that the gallons per day is shown, so that even if the number of days varies, you can get a pretty solid sense of use.

In this case, year over year, the family is saving an average of about 137  gallons per day, which is about a 25% savings from the same period a year ago. A lot of it’s coming from more careful use of sprinklers in the yard.  Not bad, but they are trying to improve it more.

What about you?  How much have you been able to cut back as compared to last year?   We can all pitch in!

  1. 4 beds, 2 full, 1 half baths
    Home size: 1,856 sq ft
    Lot size: 6,664 sqft
  2. 4 beds, 2 full, 1 half baths
    Home size: 2,113 sq ft
    Lot size: 7,187 sqft
  3. 4 beds, 2 full baths
    Home size: 1,764 sq ft
    Lot size: 7,013 sqft
  4. 3 beds, 1 full, 1 half baths
    Home size: 1,260 sq ft
    Lot size: 8,842 sqft
  5. 4 beds, 2 full baths
    Home size: 1,395 sq ft
    Lot size: 5,009 sqft
  6. 3 beds, 2 full, 1 half baths
    Home size: 1,564 sq ft
    Lot size: 1,481 sqft
  7. 2 beds, 1 full bath
    Home size: 798 sq ft
    Lot size: 7,100 sqft
  8. 2 beds, 1 full bath
    Home size: 903 sq ft
    Lot size: 7,797 sqft
  9. 6 beds, 6 full, 1 half baths
    Home size: 5,554 sq ft
    Lot size: 15,725 sqft
  10. 5 beds, 3 full baths
    Home size: 3,250 sq ft
    Lot size: 37,505 sqft

See all Real estate matching your search.
(all data current as of 5/28/2017)

Listing information deemed reliable but not guaranteed. Read full disclaimer.

Colorful flowersMost home owners know that staging a home will help to improve the selling price and give a good “bang for the buck” or return. This is even more true for staging the front yard, because usually the first impression comes online with the view of the front of the house. If the photos on the MLS (multiple listing service) and portals such as Realtor.com, Zillow and Trulia do not display a welcoming and appealing exterior from the street, many visitors to those sites often will not bother to check the inside of the house.   (When we real estate agents do virtual tours of our listings with TourFactory, that site sends us traffic reports weekly.  The front image always has the largest amount of traffic by far.)

Anyone living in the Los Gatos, San Jose or Silicon Valley area for the last decade knows that we get droughts – and we’re in a serious one now.  Many lawns look less than green.  What can you do to make the front look desirable when everything is so parched?  Here are a few tips:

  • use automatic sprinklers and set them to go at 4 or 5am, when the watering will do the most good
  • tidy the front yard: coil up hoses, dust or paint the front, sweep the porch and walkways, repair any lifted concrete which could be a tripping hazard, remove any non-essentials from view such as watering cans, toys, projects “to do”
  • consider painting the front door something colorful such as blue or red – talk to your stager about the color choice first!
  • possibly add mulch or tanbark in the planter areas (they will help to keep the moisture in when you water your plants)
  • trim back hedges which are covering any of the windows so that they are below them
  • if you have palm trees, consider trimming the dead “skirt” for a cleaner look
  • if there’s a porch, create a seating arrangement using chairs and a table
  • put colorful flowers near the front door, either along the walkway or in pots near the door (just remember that potted flowers will need frequent watering, so they are not a good choice for vacant property) – if you have enough lead time, plant bushes which flower but are not too “thirsty” – talk with someone at the garden store or research which plants will thrive in your home’s particular micro-climate and which will not require much watering

Get more tips on staging the home and making it look its best in photos here:
Selling Your Silicon Valley Home? Photo Tips for Better Marketing

  1. 3 beds, 2 full baths
    Home size: 1,510 sq ft
    Lot size: 8,363 sqft
  2. 3 beds, 2 full, 1 half baths
    Home size: 2,357 sq ft
    Lot size: 4.99 ac
  3. 5 beds, 4 full baths
    Home size: 4,100 sq ft
    Lot size: 7,492 sqft
  4. 5 beds, 4 full baths
    Home size: 3,142 sq ft
    Lot size: 7,405 sqft
  5. 3 beds, 3 full baths
    Home size: 3,208 sq ft
    Lot size: 29,620 sqft
  6. 2 beds, 1 full bath
    Home size: 574 sq ft
    Lot size: 2.89 ac
  7. 4 beds, 3 full baths
    Home size: 3,270 sq ft
    Lot size: 6.13 ac
  8. 2 beds, 1 full bath
    Home size: 1,086 sq ft
    Lot size: 8,799 sqft
  9. 2 beds, 1 full bath
    Home size: 954 sq ft
    Lot size: 10,541 sqft
  10. 2 beds, 2 full, 1 half baths
    Home size: 1,251 sq ft
    Lot size: 2,787 sqft

See all Real estate in the city of Los Gatos.
(all data current as of 5/28/2017)

Listing information deemed reliable but not guaranteed. Read full disclaimer.

Damaged wood sidingWood siding is extremely common in the San Jose area and Silicon Valley as a whole, both on condominiums & townhouses and also on houses.  (We do not see a lot of vinyl siding here, as we might in other parts of the country.) Water is the #1 enemy of houses – even more than termites!  It is necessary to control water intruding into the wood, because if it gets in, fungus and rot can get a start on your home.

How do you prevent  water damage, fungus, and dry rot on wood siding?

Exterior wood needs to be painted about every five years or it can crack, peel, and otherwise allow moisture intrusion. If the wood is kept sealed, it can do very well against water. Another big cause of expensive wood repairs outdoors is earth to wood contact.  If you have ever built a fence, or had one made for you, you’ve probably seen that the best practice is to put the wooden posts into concrete rather than directly into the dirt.  The reason is simple: soil gets damp and the wood will wick up the moisture, whether it’s fence boards, posts, part of a wooden deck, or the siding on your home.  If the siding or other wood comes near the soil, the recommendation is to separate them one way or the other. In the photo I’ve included with this article, the siding of this townhome complex was allowed to touch the earth.  You can see the results: expensive repairs needed! The old saying goes that “an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of curse”.  It’s especially true with caring for wood siding and other times of wood on the outside of your home or in your yard.   If you can remember to do a walk-around every few months, at least twice a year, you are more likely to find the beginnings of issues before they become thousands of dollars.  Keep a schedule for painting and make sure you do it before it looks like it’s needed.  If you wait until there’s chipping and cracking, you may already have trouble!  Watch for earth to wood contact, and rake away the soil or take other measures to protect your siding. This is true for owners of townhomes too.  It seems like decades ago, home owner associations were often responsible for siding, but in the last few years I’ve been finding more and more HOAs make that the owner’s responsibility, even if the HOA is in charge of the painting schedule.    Make sure that you have a look at your siding regularly so that you can stop fungus and dry rot in their tracks and prevent a small headache from becoming extremely costly. Finally, it’s a good idea to have a pest inspection (termite inspection) every 3 to 5 years to nip any issues in the bud. Related reading: What Is Cellulose Debris (in a pest or termite report)?

  1. 5 beds, 2 full, 1 half baths
    Home size: 2,624 sq ft
    Lot size: 6,490 sqft
  2. 2 beds, 2 full baths
    Home size: 1,124 sq ft
    Lot size: 2,265 sqft
  3. 3 beds, 2 full baths
    Home size: 1,716 sq ft
    Lot size: 6,011 sqft
  4. 4 beds, 2 full, 1 half baths
    Home size: 2,354 sq ft
    Lot size: 8,015 sqft
  5. 3 beds, 2 full baths
    Home size: 1,125 sq ft
    Lot size: 6,141 sqft
  6. 4 beds, 3 full baths
    Home size: 2,626 sq ft
    Lot size: 9,670 sqft
  7. 2 beds, 2 full baths
    Home size: 1,124 sq ft
    Lot size: 2,265 sqft
  8. 5 beds, 4 full baths
    Home size: 3,753 sq ft
    Lot size: 29,228 sqft
  9. 4 beds, 3 full baths
    Home size: 2,601 sq ft
    Lot size: 12,327 sqft
  10. 4 beds, 2 full baths
    Home size: 2,038 sq ft
    Lot size: 8,102 sqft

See all Real estate in the Almaden Valley community.
(all data current as of 5/28/2017)

Listing information deemed reliable but not guaranteed. Read full disclaimer.

What is fume prep?If a house or other building is going to be fumigated for drywood termites (not subterranean termites), certain things must be done for the tent to go on and to effectively seal the structure.  We call that “fume prep” work or “fumigation prep” work. It is sometimes included in the cost of the fumigation, and sometimes not – so if this work is being done at your property, be sure to ask if it’s part of the bid!  If it’s not included, there are companies that can be hired to do these jobs if you do not want to or cannot do them yourself. (If you need one in Silicon Valley, please email me and I can give you a name or two.)

Anything which obstructs being able to enclose the home or building must be cut back, disconnected or removed.  For instance:

  • fences or gates which touch the building must have a few slats or sections removed so the tent can be placed next to the house
  • bushes, hedges, trees and other plants which are adjacent to the house must be trimmed back or pulled away as much as possible – at least 12″ from the structure (if trees are touching it, they must be trimmed)
  • any other structure such as a trellis or deck must either be included with the fumigation or separated from the house so that a tent can go between it and the house
  • downspouts connected to French drains must be disconnected at the ground
  • loose gravel, tanbark or mulch needs to be raked back or removed at least 12″
  • any stored items up against the building must be removed Continue reading

Trees and neighborsIn 2007 I wrote an article on my Live in Los Gatos blog which continues to get a lot of traffic even now.  Here’s the beginning of that piece.  To see the full post, please click on the link at the bottom.

If you live in Los Gatos, or anywhere along the Santa Cruz Mountains like Almaden, Saratoga or Los Altos, you probably live with trees very near your home, as the San Jose area values its “urban forest”. And often enough, those trees arch over fences and property lines.

Ever wonder how tree ownership works in regard to property lines? Well, last week I found out. I had a tree and property line question here in Silicon Valley so called the California Association of Realtors legal hotline and spoke to an attorney about it. (The lawyer referenced case law and sent me info on it: Miller and Starr §§ 14:15, 14:16.)

To continue reading:

Trees Near the Property Line: Who Pays to Trim in California?

  1. 4 beds, 2 full, 1 half baths
    Home size: 2,113 sq ft
    Lot size: 7,187 sqft
  2. 4 beds, 2 full baths
    Home size: 1,764 sq ft
    Lot size: 7,013 sqft
  3. 3 beds, 1 full, 1 half baths
    Home size: 1,260 sq ft
    Lot size: 8,842 sqft
  4. 4 beds, 2 full baths
    Home size: 1,395 sq ft
    Lot size: 5,009 sqft
  5. 2 beds, 1 full bath
    Home size: 798 sq ft
    Lot size: 7,100 sqft
  6. 2 beds, 1 full bath
    Home size: 903 sq ft
    Lot size: 7,797 sqft
  7. 5 beds, 2 full, 1 half baths
    Home size: 2,624 sq ft
    Lot size: 6,490 sqft
  8. 0 beds, 0 baths
    Home size: 1,155 sq ft
    Lot size: 5,401 sqft
  9. 3 beds, 2 full baths
    Home size: 1,091 sq ft
    Lot size: 5,488 sqft
  10. 4 beds, 2 full baths
    Home size: 1,283 sq ft
    Lot size: 5,009 sqft

See all Real estate in the city of San Jose.
(all data current as of 5/28/2017)

Listing information deemed reliable but not guaranteed. Read full disclaimer.

Earth to Wood Contact wood losesWhether you’re looking to buy your next home or a home owner now, it’s imperative to understand how bad moisture is for wood.  So many people assume that the worst thing that can happen to a house is termites, but most of the time, it’s water – and whatever brings water to the house, fence, deck, wooden retaining wall, mailbox post, etc.

This conduit for water includes soil   Earth touching wood will conduct water up to the wood, like a wick.

Often the earth to wood contact problems come in improperly installed or maintained fences, in which the posts should be put into a concrete base.  Have a look at the image on the right – the moisture from the ground has come up to the fence, damaging the wood and likely rotting it too.

Most properties in Silicon Valley have an abundance of wood elements.  It’s smart to check them periodically to make sure that they aren’t directly touching soil.  By keeping them apart, you’ll help to extend the life of that component.

  1. 3 beds, 1 full, 1 half baths
    Home size: 1,260 sq ft
    Lot size: 8,842 sqft
  2. 4 beds, 3 full baths
    Home size: 2,289 sq ft
    Lot size: 9,757 sqft
  3. 2 beds, 2 full baths
    Home size: 1,405 sq ft
    Lot size: 435 sqft
  4. 3 beds, 2 full baths
    Home size: 1,116 sq ft
    Lot size: 8,407 sqft
  5. 3 beds, 2 full baths
    Home size: 1,834 sq ft
    Lot size: 11,499 sqft
  6. 5 beds, 3 full baths
    Home size: 2,327 sq ft
    Lot size: 9,496 sqft
  7. 3 beds, 2 full, 1 half baths
    Home size: 2,130 sq ft
    Lot size: 9,539 sqft
  8. 2 beds, 2 full baths
    Home size: 992 sq ft
    Lot size: 1,045 sqft
  9. 5 beds, 3 full baths
    Home size: 2,546 sq ft
    Lot size: 7,666 sqft
  10. 2 beds, 2 full baths
    Home size: 922 sq ft
    Lot size: 1,960 sqft

See all Real estate in the Campbell community.
(all data current as of 5/28/2017)

Listing information deemed reliable but not guaranteed. Read full disclaimer.

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Mary Pope-Handy
Realtor
ABR, CIPS, CRS, SRES
Sereno Group Real Estate
214 Los Gatos-Saratoga Rd
Los Gatos, CA 95030
408 204-7673
Mary (at) PopeHandy.com
License# 01153805


Selling homes in
Silicon Valley:
Santa Clara County,
San Mateo County, and
Santa Cruz County.
:
Special focus on:
San Jose, Los Gatos,
Saratoga, Campbell,
Almaden Valley,
Cambrian Park.
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Valley Of Hearts Delight
Santa Clara County Real Estate,
with an interest in history

Move2SiliconValley.com
Silicon Valley relocation info

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Silicon Valley real estate,
focus on home selling

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Silicon Valley real estate
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Mary’s Blog Awards
Top 25 real estate blogs 2016
2016: Personal Income's list of top 25 real estate blogs.


Best Realtor blog award
2016: Coastal Group OC's list of best Realtor blogs


The 2009 Sellsius list of top 12 women real estate bloggers
2009: Sellsius list of top
12 women real estate bloggers


Mary Pope-Handy's Live in Los Gatos blog won the 2007 Project Blogger contest, sponsored by Inman News and Active Rain

2007: Mary Pope-Handy and Frances Flynn Thorsen win the Project Blogger Contest for Mary's Live in Los Gatos blog. The contest was sponsored by
Active Rain and Inman News.


Non blog award


Best real estate agent in Silicon Valley from the San Jose Mercury News poll of readers in 2011
"Best real estate agent
in Silicon Valley"

2011 readers' poll,
San Jose Mercury News

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