Selling Tips

Tips for Home Sellers

Close to the Los Gatos border sits one of the more affordable Cambrian neighborhoods in San Jose and the west valley generally. It enjoys lovely views of the hills, great public schools with high API scores, a neighborhood private school to boot, and convenient access to freeways and stores. There’s no sign, marker or gateway to the area, so many of its residents are probably unaware that the official name to it is Cambrian Gardens.

This neighborhood provides an incredible “bang for the buck” for home buyers wanting excellent schools and not wanting to pay luxury home pricing. In many ways, it’s a “sleeper” – meaning that many people don’t know it’s there, but it’s a good deal!

Continue reading

Convenient to Good Samaritan Hospital, Carlton Elementary School and freeway access to highways 17 and 85, the beautiful “King Street” neighborhood in San Jose’s Cambrian Park district seems to be close to everything. But a drive through the tree-lined streets with tidy homes seems like a relaxing step into the welcoming neighborhoods of yesteryear rather than the hustle and bustle of today’s Silicon Valley.

Typical "King Street" House

As with the nearby Alta Vista neighborhood, homes here show a pride of ownership not found everywhere. Holidays include beautiful displays of lights that invite neighbors out to tour after dark. Many home owners wrap the trunk of the trees between the sidewalk and street with blankets of white lights, making for a stunning look down the road.

The “King Streets” enjoy an uncommon appeal that makes homes here perennially desirable to home buyers. The popularity of the area is due partly to the convenience factor (easy to get to a great elementary school with high API scores, easy to get to the freeways, Los Gatos and Good Sam) and the beauty or neighborhood charm factor. It is a winning combination for this west valley community! Many who wish to live in Los Gatos choose this part of San Jose because it’s on the border, so it is not uncommon for the King Streets to be a first home and the move up one is in Los Gatos.


View “The King Streets” in a larger map
Continue reading

Hiring a Realtor? Silicon Valley home sellers are very savvy and go at their real estate transactions carefully. However, some may be tempted to try to line all the criteria up in side by side charts and attempt to make a hiring decion that way. Please beware the temptation of focusing on what is “easily measurable” as most important. Sometimes the most easily measurable factors may not be that important at all. Much of what is truly valuable in a Realtor’s suite of services and skills cannot be easily measured in a side-by-side comparison chart.

If you’ve been trying to sell your home in Los Gatos, Saratoga, Almaden Valley, Cambrian, or anywhere in the greater San Jose area but haven’t received an offer yet, don’t despair!  With our mild winters, you really can sell real estate any time of year.  And inventory is extremely tight right now, increasing your odds of success.

In late November and December a lot of folks DO pull their property off the market, and the result is a, even further tightening of inventory across Silicon Valley from the months immediately prior. The ratio between listed and sale pending homes improves dramatically. (The “absorption rate” tends to get better with fewer houses, condos and townhouses listed on the MLS.)

But you’re thinking: it’s a hassle. It’s the holidays. Is this any time to sell Silicon Valley real estate?

And you’re right about that. So do it differently.
Continue reading

Rinconada Hills in Los Gatos HOA dues covers pools, tennis courts, ponds, walking trails, a clubhouse, RV parking, and more.

Rinconada Hills in Los Gatos – HOA dues cover pools, tennis courts, ponds, walking trails, a clubhouse, RV parking, and more.

Home Owner Association or HOA dues are monthly fees charged in some communities for shared amenities, insurance, or other services.  These may be for houses, townhouses (townhomes), or condominiums (condos).

What do the HOA dues cost?

As of this writing (Sept 2016), the lowest amount I am seeing for HOA dues in the San Jose area is approximately $275 per month and the most about $1,000 per month. Typical is $350 to $450.  If a complex offers more services or perks, expect to pay more.

Some condos, townhomes, or houses for sale with HOAs may disclose the monthly amount due. Be sure to also find out if there are other payments not included. I know of one complex in Saratoga that has very expensive insurance payments, making the actual monthly payment much higher than what might be stated in the MLS. So always ask if there are any quarterly, semi-annual, or annual fees due in addition to the monthly HOA dues.

Beware: sometimes younger complexes under-charge, either by accident or as an inducement to get you to buy.  This is not a good thing because eventually that community will find it’s short of funds and will need to have a special assessment to get back on track.

Special assessments are a nightmare for home owners.  When buying a condo, townhouse, or house in a complex with a Home Owner Association, make sure to read the very boring HOA docs carefully, and pay special attention to the reserve account. Reserves are necessary for the anticipated maintenance (such as repaving the private roads or re-plastering the pool every so often).  It’s no small matter to correctly anticipate future needs, but if it’s done wrong, you may get the unhappy news of an un-anticipated assessment.

What do HOA dues cover?

The dues may cover private roads, gates, security personnel, community pools, landscaping, exterior painting, roof repairs or re-roofing, insurance (possibly homeowner’s, blanket, or earthquake), or maybe pest control work.  Some HOAs include RV parking, ponds, trails, tennis courts, club houses and other more extravagant features. They will all drive the HOA fees up!

Don’t assume anything when it comes to your unit coverage. Although many Home Owner Associations will cover things like exterior painting, roofing, or pest work, they don’t all. You’ll have to read the HOA docs to know what’s covered (and what’s not).

Some nice communities with HOA dues include these:

Saratoga Oaks
Almaden Winery (3 subdivisions)
Glencrest Patio Homes (in Almaden)
Rinconada Hills
Arroyo Rinconada
Los Gatos Estates
Los Gatos Woods
Bluebird Lane

The cooling Silicon Valley real estate market is less of a question and more of an acknowledged fact (we wondered about it in June, we are sure now). If so, how can you tell? We need to begin by talking about “the market”.

First, Silicon Valley doesn’t have ONE market. The real estate market in Palo Alto or Cupertino is going to be very different from the realty market in Los Gatos, or the various parts of San Jose, such as Almaden, Willow Glen, Cambrian, or Blossom Valley. Ditto that with price points. It’s a very different “market” for entry level houses than for luxury homes.

But if we’re going to speak in broad, sweeping terms about cooling trends, what do we SEE? What do we HEAR? What’s happening with offers and open houses? These are the ways we measure the real estate climate. Often we in the industry hear the anecdotal evidence long before it’s reported in the paper. If we hear one Realtor friend after the next report quiet open houses, or few or no offers, we know there’s a climate change afoot.

I will tell you that I am hearing these things, which hint to a softer market for home buyers:

  • Houses taking longer to sell in much of Silicon Valley / Santa Clara County
  • Homes selling with fewer offers than 6 or 12 months ago
  • Contingencies for loan, appraisal and inspection becoming more common
  • More price reductions being necessary for than a few months ago
  • Fewer ALL CASH offers
  • Sale price to list price coming down a little

All of these suggest a mellowing of the housing market. Do the numbers line up?

The cooling Silicon Valley real estate market: seasonal fluctuations…

Historically, we do know that the busiest time for home sales is usually February – April. Some years it’s shorter or longer. (One particularly bad year, we had exactly 3 good weeks for selling in March and nothing more.) But what do the numbers tell us?

If we view the sale price to list price ratio, we expect there to be “seasonal fluctuations”. We don’t expect a hot seller’s market in December. Therefore, what’s often most helpful is comparing the same statistics year over year. Let’s do that.  The image below provides the sale price to list price ratio for houses sold in Santa Clara County from Jan 1 2012 through Aug  24, 2016 (the day I grabbed this data). This was taken from the MLSListings.com site for agents (the private MLS).

I love this kind of presentation because it’s so easy to see both month over month and year over year statistics. Take a look at August (so far) for this year compared to the prior months in 2016.  At 101.5% that seems like a fantastic ratio (they would go nuts for this in most of the U.S.). Now compare it to the prior months this year and you can see it’s been coming down since March.  OK, now consider prior years…it’s mostly a very similar pattern. That tells us that “spring is hotter”. We already knew that, but seeing it for most of the last few years pretty much drives the point home.

But let’s compare August 2016 to August 2012- Aug 2015.  That’s a better “apples to apples” comparison. And here it’s very clear that the real estate market in Silicon Valley really IS COOLER than it was in prior years for the same month. Any doubts? Check the same info for July – yes, all hotter until you get to July 2012.  Now June – same as for July. May? Yes, again, hotter for that month in 2013, 2014, and 2015 but not 2012. In retrospect, we now know that 2012 was the year the market ratcheted up for a big, long run.

The cooling Silicon Valley real estate market: Santa Clara County sale price to list price ratio Jan 2011 to Aug 24 2016

Before anyone begins screaming that the sky is falling, let me stop and remind you that we are talking about a sale price to list price ratio for the entire county that is at more than 101%. This is not a buyer’s market – at least not as a county. There are hotter and cooler pockets, yes, for sure.

What we are experiencing is a return to normalcy, a flattening out, less appreciation. We are not seeing price drops at this time.

And you know what? We’ve been expecting it.

You cannot sustain double digit appreciation forever.

The reality of the cooling Silicon Valley real estate market has implications for home buyers and home sellers:

Buyers, GET OFF THE FENCE. Interest rates are good. Buying conditions are reasonable again. Yes, inventory is low, but if you know what you want, you should be able to find it in 2-3 months tops. If you can’t, then you are not being realistic with what you think you can buy for your budget.

Sellers, it’s time to be more aggressive on pricing and adjust your expectations. Yes, your neighbor got 15 offers in February, but it’s not February any more. If you get 1-3 offers, that means you did a great job of staging, pricing, and getting your home marketed. Position your home to sell, and then get it done.

Where will we be in 6 or 9 months? I don’t know. It could be better or worse after the election. My advise is to get on with your life and not try to time it too carefully, because things can happen which none of us could anticipate. If you want or need to buy or sell, make it happen.There will always be political things going on, world events taking place. There is never a perfect time to buy or sell – but there is the time you want to do it. Go ahead.

And please let me know how I can help.

Mary Pope-handy
408 204-7673

Sell in a cooling marketDo you need to sell today, in a cooling market? Many people know that in Silicon Valley, often the best time to sell your home is anywhere from January to May – and after that, the sales begin to slow and sometimes prices fall. This year, that seems to be happening, and more. We are now in early August and it’s definitely a shifting market.

How are you going to sell your home in a cooling real estate market?

Sometimes you have to sell when you don’t really want to. Maybe it’s a divorce, a job transfer, death of a spouse, loss of a job, or maybe even something good – the type of home you’ve been waiting years to buy is now available. But you have to sell first, before you can buy. For better or worse, you need to sell now, when the market is cooling.   What to do?

Understand the pattern. Jump the line.

Information is power.  Learn the market stats and figure out the trajectory. If homes are losing value at the rate of 1% a month and your house isn’t selling, you may need to JUMP the line to get ahead of the curve.  Translation: let’s say it looks like prices are going down .25% per week for a house like yours. If you “hold out” and don’t reduce your price to sell, the gap between what you think your home is worth and what capable buyers will think it is worth may widen. But instead, if you cut your price 1.5%, you may be able to be the first home sold. Wait a few more weeks, and it could be much worse.  The quick way of saying it is to “cut your losses”. In a declining market, the longer it takes to sell, the more you lose. It’s that simple.

 

What does a title company do? People helping buyers, sellers, real estate professionals with title and escrow work.What is the function of a title company or title insurance company in real estate purchases or refinances? In Silicon Valley, and the San Francisco Bay Area and northern California generally, title companies perform two specific services:

  • provide title insurance for real estate being bought or borrowed against
  • provide escrow services, acting as the neutral third party which takes in the deposit money and holds it during the escrow period, disbursing all funds when escrow closes and having someone go to the county recorder’s office to record the deeds to complete the sale

Title insurance companies research the title history, find out what recorded easements may exist,reveal any encumbrances (leins, clouds on title, etc.). An escrow officer from the title company is usually the professional with a notary’s license who will sign off home buyers and sellers on the final documents, too.

There are many other services that title companies provide. Many people wonder how to hold title, and while neither your Realtor nor your escrow officer can advise you on how to do so, the title companies all have a little 1 page handout explaining the major concepts for each option on how to hold title.

If you need to sign off on the final documents out of town or even out of the country, the escrow officer and her or his support staff will work with you to coordinate it. (It can be a little tricky if overseas and outside of the U.S.).

If you are selling your house or condo and discover that an old loan that you paid off is still showing up in the preliminary title report, the escrow officer at the title insurance company will work to get it resolved and removed.

The customer service department at title companies can research the chain of title, too. Sometimes it’s quite interesting as the chain brings you back to the time of patents and land grants, with hand written deeds in a style of cursive which is somewhat foreign to us today.

There are many other things that title companies do – big and small – and most of them are “behind the scenes” that few of us ever witness directly, but without which no one would be able to close out sales with the safety net of title insurance which we value so much.

Title insurance can be a confusing concept, but I wrote about it elsewhere on this site.

What Is Title Insurance and Who Pays For It?
What is a preliminary title report? Why does it matter?

Realtor Logo in BlueIn Silicon Valley, most of the licensed real estate professionals belong to local, state, and a national trade group.  There’s a name for members of these associations, in which dues paying members promise to abide by a code of ethics.  Do you know that the name is?  You’ll hear various things, even out of members: Realtor, Realitor, Realator, Relator, Reeltur.  Which is it? The answer is the first one, REALTOR.  It’s two syllables, pronounced Real-tor. (There is no a, e, i, o, or u between the REAL and the TOR parts.)

Also, please note that being a member of the National Association of Realtors (NAR), the California Association of Realtors (CAR) and the Silicon Valley Association of Realtors (SILVAR) is not the same as being licensed. The states issue licenses for real estate sales people, brokers, and other professionals. Realtors are first licensed by the state and then voluntarily join the trade group for the industry. In California, it’s now the Bureau of Real Estate which issues the salesperson or broker licnese. (Please see the related article at the bottom of this post for more on that.)

Looking for a Silicon Valley Realtor? A Los Gatos Realtor? A San Jose Realtor? Please call or email me, Mary Pope-Handy, to chat about your real estate needs, buying and selling a home here in the South Bay area. And please, don’t call me or anyone else Realitor, Realator, Relator, or Reeltur!

Please also see
What’s the Difference between a Realtor and a Real Estate Agent or Licensee?

Earnest Money logoEarnest money refers to a home buyer’s deposit on a home that he or she is in contract to purchase.  It’s often called an earnest money deposit, initial deposit, or good faith deposit in Silicon Valley.  The terms are all interchangeable.

How much is the earnest money?

In the San Jose & Los Gatos areas, and Santa Clara County generally, the earnest money is usually 3% of the purchase price of the home.  It is placed in an escrow account, which is usually at a title company (in northern California that’s how it is handled – in Southern California, often there is a separate escrow company).

Ordinarily, funds are due within 3 business days of acceptance of the contract, but that can be changed (it’s one of the few places where the CAR and PRDS contracts reference business days rather than calendar days). Some listing agents will counter back that funds need to be in title the next day after the offer is ratified. Some buyers may request more than 3 days if their funds are coming from abroad.  With competitive, multiple offer situations, buyers should anticipate needing to get the money to title fast and have it ready to go before the offer is presented so that they aren’t at a disadvantage.

Is a cashier’s check required for the good faith deposit?

The initial deposit does not have to be a cashier’s check, however, some listing agents and sellers may request that in a counter offer.  That’s most likely to happen in a very competitive multiple offer frenzy, and unlikely to happen if it’s just one or two bids.

Increasingly, the funds today are wired to title, but in some cases, buyers may instead write a check. For the earnest money deposit, it may be a personal check. (At the end of escrow, it must be either a cashier’s check or a wire to bring the balance of the down payment to title. Both of these are referred to as “good funds”.)  It is important for home buyers to draft the check  correctly (not made out to just “title company”, for instance), and to understand that this isn’t a check that just sits in a drawer.  The check for the initial deposit is cashed by the escrow company as soon as they get it.  Real estate brokerages tend to prefer that Realtors don’t touch the buyer’s funds, so many are encouraging that consumers wire in funds rather than hand a check to a real estate agent.

Phishing and wire fraud is a concern, so when sending funds in electronically it is extremely important to phone the title company and verify the specific instructions.

Does the earnest money count as part of the entire down payment?

Yes, if the buyer is putting 20% down on some real estate, the initial deposit is likely to be 3% and the balance of the down payment will be 17%.  The balance of funds will need to be in escrow a couple of days before closing.  Many lenders will not fund the loan on the property until and unless the buyer’s money is in escrow first.

Can the buyers get the initial deposit back if they change their minds about buying the home?

This is not a “one size fits all” question.  If the buyers have contingencies, it may be possible to back out of the transaction and have the full deposit returned.  If the buyer has written an offer with no contingencies, that may be an uphill battle, and time to consult with a real estate attorney, as Realtors are not qualified nor allowed to provide tax or legal advice.

 

Related Reading:
What is escrow? (on popehandy.com blog)
What do international home buyers need to know about financing a real estate purchase in the United States? (on Move2SiliconValley.com – relocation site)

 

1 2 3 26
Translation

by Transposh - translation plugin for wordpress
Mary Pope-Handy
Realtor
ABR, CIPS, CRS, SRES
Sereno Group Real Estate
214 Los Gatos-Saratoga Rd
Los Gatos, CA 95030
408 204-7673
Mary (at) PopeHandy.com
License# 01153805


Selling homes in
Silicon Valley:
Santa Clara County,
San Mateo County, and
Santa Cruz County.
:
Special focus on:
San Jose, Los Gatos,
Saratoga, Campbell,
Almaden Valley,
Cambrian Park.
Let’s Connect
Find Mary on FacebookFollow Mary on Twitter
RSS FeedFollow Mary on YouTube

Please see more icons
at the bottom of the page.

The real estate search
Use the widget below to browse properties which are for sale, under contract (pending) or sold. Want to view only homes which are available now? Use the "find a home" link on the menu above (next to the "home" button).
Mary’s other sites & blogs
Valley Of Hearts Delight
Santa Clara County Real Estate,
with an interest in history

Move2SiliconValley.com
Silicon Valley relocation info

popehandy.com
Silicon Valley real estate,
focus on home selling

Silicon Valley Real Estate Report
Silicon Valley real estate
market trends & statistics
Mary’s Blog Awards
Top 25 real estate blogs 2016
2016: Personal Income's list of top 25 real estate blogs.


Best Realtor blog award
2016: Coastal Group OC's list of best Realtor blogs


The 2009 Sellsius list of top 12 women real estate bloggers
2009: Sellsius list of top
12 women real estate bloggers


Mary Pope-Handy's Live in Los Gatos blog won the 2007 Project Blogger contest, sponsored by Inman News and Active Rain

2007: Mary Pope-Handy and Frances Flynn Thorsen win the Project Blogger Contest for Mary's Live in Los Gatos blog. The contest was sponsored by
Active Rain and Inman News.


Non blog award


Best real estate agent in Silicon Valley from the San Jose Mercury News poll of readers in 2011
"Best real estate agent
in Silicon Valley"

2011 readers' poll,
San Jose Mercury News

Categories
Site Statistics
  • Users online: 2 
  • Visitors today : 521
  • Page views today : 2,094