"Multiple offers" - artwork

“Multiple offers”

Recently I have been in quite a few multiple offer situations with my Silicon Valley home buyers (ranging to as many as 15 contracts on a Los Gatos house). Understandably, home buyers do not want to pay more than a home “is worth”. With several buyers all vying for the same property, though, the price is driven up. That’s a seller’s dream and a buyer’s nightmare. Is it possible to pay fair market value, and not more, with multiple offers?

What is fair market value?

With a little research, you may find a few slightly different definitions of fair market value. Most, though, include these elements:

  • Both buyer and seller are reasonably motivated (but not under any undue pressure)
  • Both buyer and seller are well informed and acting in their own best interests
  • The home or property has been given enough exposure such that the market has been tested
  • There are no special concessions that would impact the sale price (such as a year long free rent back, including all the furniture or personal property, the seller carrying the mortgage at a very high or very low rate of interest). Likewise, no other special terms that would increase or decrease the sale price.
  • In other words, fair market value is usually achieved when the buyer and seller have a normal sale, with normal time frames, normal contingencies, normal relationships to one another. Most of the time, this is the result of one offer on the house after a week or two on the open market.

    If a seller or buyer is desperate to sell or buy, you probably won’t see fair market value. Similarly, if a parent sells the family home to a son or daughter, there’s a good chance it will never be a matter of exposing it to the pool of buyers, and the price is likely to be soft. Off market sales may be on the low side, though recently we’re seeing buyers in those circumstances paying more just to secure the property. A buyer who writes an offer subject to the sale of her or his home will be at a negotiating disadvantage, but a seller may accept that bid if the home has been on the market awhile, there is no other competition, and if the sale price is higher than it otherwise would be. (They’ll accept more risk for a higher sale price.)

    With multiple offers, usually there is undue pressure on the buyer to compete with better terms (few or no contingencies, faster than normal sale, buyer picking up more of the seller’s costs) and better pricing. Nearly always, bidding wars will result in a sale price that is more than fair market value. Frequently there’s a “band of pricing” which is above the list price. Most home buyers will fall into that range, and when a home has been listed a little on the low side, this band may represent fair market value. This can be far exceeded if one super motivated person, an outlier, spikes the price.

    In summary, residential real estate sales that take place with multiple offers will usually be with terms that strongly favor the seller and with a price that is above fair market value. It is not usually possible to pay fair market value with multiple offers – most of the time, the property will sell for more than fair market value.

    Silicon Valley buyer and seller advice

    Fiscally conservative home buyers in Silicon Valley will find this a very frustrating and discouraging situation as they write offers for “fair” prices and find them too low each time – and to see prices rising! When that happens, the more offers they write and the longer they take to buy, the more expensive it becomes to purchase anything at all. Today we have the double whammy of rising interest rates, too. My best advice is to find a property in a good location with fixable defects (such as an ugly kitchen, not a location problem, which you cannot change) which has been on the market more than 3 weeks. In that case you will probably have no other competition and can pay what is fair market value rather than an inflated price to due multiple bids.

    Conservative home sellers are sometimes afraid to slightly underprice their property to attract multiple offers. That is understandable, so I would suggest never putting a price on the home that you wouldn’t actually accept. There are many things you can do to get your home to sell fast (within 2 weeks) and which will attract a few buyers. Those aren’t so risky but they do involve some work. If your property looks like “the best deal”, you can be sure that the home buying public will notice. Just don’t undermine yourself by being present at showings, making it too hard for buyers to see your property, or not making the home attractive and risk free to home buyers. I have written many articles on how to attract buyers who will pay top dollar – you can google “pope-handy home seller tips” or start with this piece: How to make people line up and beg to buy your home.

    For more reading:

    On this site: All comps are not equal

    On popehandy.com: How much is your home really worth? (Discussion on fair market value vs appraisal value in addition to other factors)

    Translation

    by Transposh - translation plugin for wordpress
    Mary Pope-Handy
    Realtor
    ABR, CIPS, CRS, SRES
    Sereno Group Real Estate
    214 Los Gatos-Saratoga Rd
    Los Gatos, CA 95030
    408 204-7673
    Mary (at) PopeHandy.com
    License# 01153805


    Selling homes in
    Silicon Valley:
    Santa Clara County,
    San Mateo County, and
    Santa Cruz County.
    :
    Special focus on:
    San Jose, Los Gatos,
    Saratoga, Campbell,
    Almaden Valley,
    Cambrian Park.
    Let’s Connect
    Find Mary on FacebookFollow Mary on Twitter
    RSS FeedFollow Mary on YouTube

    Please see more icons
    at the bottom of the page.

    The real estate search
    Use the widget below to browse properties which are for sale, under contract (pending) or sold. Want to view only homes which are available now? Use the "find a home" link on the menu above (next to the "home" button).
    Mary’s other sites & blogs
    Valley Of Hearts Delight
    Santa Clara County Real Estate,
    with an interest in history

    Move2SiliconValley.com
    Silicon Valley relocation info

    popehandy.com
    Silicon Valley real estate,
    focus on home selling

    Silicon Valley Real Estate Report
    Silicon Valley real estate
    market trends & statistics
    Mary’s Blog Awards
    Top 25 real estate blogs 2016
    2016: Personal Income's list of top 25 real estate blogs.


    Best Realtor blog award
    2016: Coastal Group OC's list of best Realtor blogs


    The 2009 Sellsius list of top 12 women real estate bloggers
    2009: Sellsius list of top
    12 women real estate bloggers


    Mary Pope-Handy's Live in Los Gatos blog won the 2007 Project Blogger contest, sponsored by Inman News and Active Rain

    2007: Mary Pope-Handy and Frances Flynn Thorsen win the Project Blogger Contest for Mary's Live in Los Gatos blog. The contest was sponsored by
    Active Rain and Inman News.


    Non blog award


    Best real estate agent in Silicon Valley from the San Jose Mercury News poll of readers in 2011
    "Best real estate agent
    in Silicon Valley"

    2011 readers' poll,
    San Jose Mercury News

    Categories
    Site Statistics
    • Users online: 1 
    • Visitors today : 1,245
    • Page views today : 4,712