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Mary Pope-Handy
Realtor
ABR, CIPS, CRS, SRES
Sereno Group Real Estate
214 Los Gatos-Saratoga Rd
Los Gatos, CA 95030
408 204-7673
Mary (at) PopeHandy.com
License# 01153805


Selling homes in
Silicon Valley
:
San Jose, Los Gatos,
Saratoga, Campbell,
Almaden Valley,
Cambrian Park and
Santa Clara County

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Posts Tagged ‘sellers’

What’s most important to home sellers: highest price, fast close, all cash, no contingencies, pre-approved loan or what?

Tuesday, April 22nd, 2014

When home sellers receive multiple offers on their property, they get to prioritize what they want most. Is it all cash, the highest price, the fastest close of escrow, or no contingencies? This 45 second video of home sales in 2013 may surprise you!  (Per the California Association of Realtors – so apparently home sales in CA.) When writing your real estate contract, it’s good to keep this info in mind – too often, cash buyers in particular don’t appreciate that most sellers are after the #1 item listed in this quick video.

Overheated market, overheated emotions

Saturday, April 7th, 2012

Overheated Market and emotionsThe Silicon Valley real estate market is so overheated in many segments (some areas, some pricepoints) that there’s a lot of exhaustion to be found among consumers, Realtors and others involved (inspectors, title company employees, etc.).  Why is that?

  • Home buyers in the San Jose area are finding that most of the time, they have to write a few offers before one can get accepted. The rejection is both disappointing and exhausting, and every successive attempt is stressful since most buyers understand that with multiple offer situations, the odds are against them.
  • Home sellers in Santa Clara County are finding it a challenge to work like crazy to make their property as close to ideal as possible, only to find that multiple offers either aren’t ideal (or still seem scary, if they are ideal) or perhaps they don’t come at all. Even in a hot market, not every home sells!  Some home owners work so hard at fixing up their house or condo to sell that they somewhat fall in love with it all over again…and that makes it hard to sell. Their pre-sale exhaustion also can make them prone to feeling overwhelmed.
  • Real estate agents or licensees are exhausted because there is so much URGENCY that it’s hard to get any down time (let alone a day off). Most real estate licensees  I know are really burned out – or very close to it – due to working 24/7 for the last 2+ months.  (Buyers are very time consuming and may require many many attempts before being successful in getting into contract. Sellers may have worries and find themselves needing a lot of reassurance – even when it’s not really urgent at all.)

Together with the extra stress of the market which changed so fast are a LOT of emotions (as well as mistakes that might not be made if everyone were calmer and better rested).  Buyers grieve when they lose the house.  Sellers worry that they sold too fast, too low, too easily.  Buyers, when successful, worry that they have overpaid (“buyers remorse“).  Agents are burning the candle at both ends and can find themselves a little frazzled too.  Sometimes when our clients have a bad day, they can make it contagious by yelling at us or otherwise being overly difficult because they are stressed. Even agents dealing with other agents can be a headache if the other one is upset, burned out, sloppy or emotional.

Time out!  What most everyone needs (myself included) is a breather.  Everyone needs a little time, a little down time, to feel a bit more human.  Take a day off. Decide not to answer the phone or email before or after set hours.  As for me, I’m going to work on that.  I hate to see email accumulate in my inbox, I feel like I have to address it right away (as if it were a text message about a house burning down).  But being in reactive mode, no matter who we are, is not so good in the long run. When the going gets tough, it’s more important than ever to get enough sleep, exercise (esp time away from the computer) and diversions.  Too much intensity can make for more friction, and in the long run, that is bad for the transaction, bad for our relatinships and even bad for our own personal health.

So in this overheated, stressful market – let’s all try to step back enough so that we can clear our heads a little and keep a semblance of balance. It will make for better real estate transactions in the long run, no matter whether we are buying, selling, or assisting clients as realty professionals in the South Bay.

More reading:

Qualify The Advice You’ll Accept When Buying or Selling a Home in Silicon Valley

Impulsivity and caution in home buying

The Cross-Cultural Real Estate Experience: Buying and Selling Homes in Silicon Valley vs Other Places

Sunday, July 18th, 2010

Buying and selling homes is stressful no matter who you are or what the occasion may be.  It is even more difficult for those for whom English is not their native language and for whom the US is not their native land.

First there’s a language challenge (depending on English fluency).  Even more, there’s a cultural challenge in terms of how homes are bought and sold. Add the normal stress to the cross-cultural confusion and there’s a recipe for misunderstanding, bafflement, surprises and upset.  One of the biggest areas for clashes is how negotiations are carried out.

I have had the pleasure of traveling to many places around the globe and to live in Italy for the better part of a year while in college (in Florence, and yes, I loved it).  I remember very vividly some of my own cultural frustrations and although I was fairly fluent, missing a whole lot of social cues. I had to work to learn to negotiate for simple things like fruit and sweaters in the open air markets.  And I was just 20, not trying to purchase anything as significant as a house or condo.

My clients today come from all over. Typically, at any given time, more than half of my clients are foreign* (and I love working with them and hearing about their experiences, customs and traditions).  Every once in awhile,  we discover that buying and selling expectations are vastly different from Silicon Valley to wherever they came from. Here are a few:

  1. Expecting to negotiate at every turn, starting from the time the seller accepts the buyer’s offer and continuing until close of escrow (not done here: you negotiate at most two times – first when writing and countering offers and second prior to removing contingencies, if something new is learned during the course of the inspections.  If you negotiate at every opportunity, you will have everyone angry at you!)
  2. (more…)

Homebuyer Tax Credit Good for “Move Down” Buyers Too

Tuesday, January 5th, 2010

Recently I read an article on Realty Times about the tax credit for non-first time homebuyers. Did you know that it may be used for “move down” buyers as well as “move up” buyers?

There are some caveats – the home cannot cost more than $800,000 and a couple cannot earn more than $255,000 per year.  Owners must have been in the home for five consecutive years of the last eight.  This may be the ideal help for Silicon Valley seniors wanting to downsize.

To read the article on Realty Times, click here.

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