What Are CCRs?

CCRs are the Covenants, Conditions, and Restrictions  (sometimes “Covenants, Codes & Restrictions”) for a neighborhood, subdivision, condo or townhouse community.  They are drawn up by the builder or by a board comprised of the builder and a few others who want to set the neighborhood standards. Sometimes you’ll hear them called CC and Rs or CC&Rs.

The CCRs  are put in place, usually for a set number of years such as for 30 or 35 years, with automatic extensions of a prescribed number of years (such as 5 or 10) unless the homeowners in that tract or area vote t hem out.

The weirdest time line I ever saw in CCRs referenced something like “until the death of the last living great grandchild of…” and it mentioned one of the Kennedys. Odd, but apparently legit.

What are the CCRs about?

Ordinarily the CCRs tell us that homes cannot be too small, that livestock cannot be raised at the property, that home owners may not drill for oil or water, and many other kind of common sense things.  The older ones will also state that the house must have a minimum value – often so small it might make us chuckle.

 

CCRs sample one

 

Additionally, the covenants, conditions, and restrictions will state what kind of signage may appear (only for sale and for rent signs, for instance, no billboards), and normally there’s a admonishment against noxious or offensive materials such as rubbish piling up on the property.

Newer CCRs, especially in condo communities or townhouse complexes, may have restrictions on things like what color the curtains or blinds must be if facing the street (white or off white or beige only). Often they state that garage doors must be fully down except when vehicles are entering or exiting. Some communities, like Rinconada Hills in Los Gatos, do not permit you to park your vehicle in the driveway overnight – it needs to be in the garage.

CCRs only one car on the street allowed

Many disallow washing vehicles in the complex. Right now that’s moot since the drought has the water company prohibiting all of us from doing that.

Condo and townhome CCRs

In condominium and townhome complexes, the CCRs are crucially important! Some of them have rules like:

  • no more than 2 pets
  • dogs may not be of these breeds (list)
  • dogs may not weigh more than 20 pounds (or some other number)
  • laundry may not be dried on balconies
  • storage may not be left on balconies
  • laundry and dishwashers may not run after 10 pm
  • only people over the age of 55 (or some other age) may live at the complex

And MANY other clauses. Always always read the CCRs !

Illegal restrictions in the CCRs

Many years ago, some CCRs also had restrictions on who might buy or live in a neighborhood (racial, religious, and other restrictions).  This is illegal today, of course, and so the first page of any CC&R document you see now will have a large disclaimer stating that any fair housing violations are illegal and are null & void. (At least it should be there.)

Click on the following link to download the PDF of the typical CCRs cover sheet.

Since the C C & Rs “run with the property”, until recently we were told that they cannot be amended. Want to see the cover sheet itself? Now, though, thanks to recent legislation, those offensive restrictions can be stricken from the CCRs.  (more…)

Porta Potty Proliferation

Porta Potty CollageHave you noticed that there now seems to be a porta potty on every block? It’s a proliferation of porta potties! One might be tempted to call it a pandemic of bottomless proportions.

This panoply of modern day outhouses appeared en masse over the last couple of years. Of course, their appearance is the hallmark of home improvement or updating, at least most of the time.

Once in awhile it’s instead the hallmark of a stalled project. It can be a real challenge to get contractors to work on our homes and yards right now. The demand is tremendous and the waits can be long. Sometimes the lengthy stay of the temporary structure isn’t anyone’s fault.

That said, there do seem to be better and worse porta potty placement, and some really do overstay their welcome and become a problem – a neighborhood eyesore or blight. It might be said that like houseguests, portable toilets have a limited shelf life for desirability as far as the neighbors are concerned.

In this post we’ll touch on half bathrooms (created to serve a similar purpose), CCRs, and regulations regarding these portable toilets and where and how long they can adorn front yards.

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