South County

South County refers to the southern part of Santa Clara County, namely Morgan Hill, San Martin, Gilroy, and further out to the county lines.

There’s a tremendous amount of variety within this area in terms of neighborhood, terrain, home types, urban vs rural, etc. On our local multiple listing service, this vast region is all “Area 1”.

 

Morgan Hill Jackson Oaks view of South County

South County living

People living in South County may be in a fairly urban area of Gilroy or Morgan Hill, with restaurants, shops, and a train station within a few blocks. It could be more suburban or centered on or near a golf course, parkland, or other open space.

The could just as easily be in farmland or ranchland, with vineyards, fruit and nut orchards, or other produce growing (particularly garlic and mushrooms). There are even some flower farms and grass farms in this part of Santa Clara County! Possibly instead your neighbors could be goats, horses, donkeys, cows, or sheep, depending on how far out you’re looking.

These communities are populated mostly close to Highway 101, and are otherwise fairly rural.

Morgan Hill, San Martin, and Gilroy info

 

Please check out the individual posts for these South County areas and learn more about each of them:

Related reading on another of our sites

Morgan Hill (on popehandy.com)

San Martin real estate (on popehandy.com

Gilroy (on popehandy.com

Lawn mushrooms or toadstools

Toadstools or lawn mushroomsLawn mushrooms are the bane of gardeners everywhere; we usually refer to these unwanted pests as toadstools.  Toadstools are really the same thing as mushrooms but are often poisonous.

These members of the fungus family pop up when we get a little moisture, so they are a common sight once rain appears, as it has been doing a lot lately.   They are not harmful to the lawn if left alone, but people with pets and children may be concerned about these unwanted visitors being ingested, causing sickness or death – so for that reason, it may be advisable to rid your yard of them.

Tips for removing lawn mushrooms

These fungi thrive on decomposing plant matter, whether it’s old roots, sawdust, animal droppings, or a fallen log. They also thrive in dark, wet areas. Some of the suggested treatments involve these steps:

  1. Remove what they are feeding on, such as pet waste, a buildup of mulch or leaves, etc.
  2. Wearing gloves, carefully cut or remove the lawn mushrooms and put them into a plastic bag that you seal so that it cannot reproduce.
  3. Aerate or de-thatch your lawn.
  4. Add soapy water to the area where you have removed the lawn mushroom.
  5. Another option, perhaps not the best first choice, is to apply a fungicide.

Do wear gloves when handling them directly.   Want more info?  Here are a few articles to help:

Bob Villa: mushrooms in the lawn

Mushrooms and Other Nuisance Fungi in Lawns (University of California)