Willow Glen real estate market in San Jose

Willow Glen real estate market is a strong seller's market. This Willow Glen sign is from the downtown business district.The Willow Glen real estate market in San Jose remains a strong seller’s market.

  • Average and median home prices are up monthly and yearly.
  • Homes are selling in 11 days on average – super hot.
  • The sale to list price rose again to 108% in April (up from106.7% in March)

The best priced homes with no location or condition issues continue to sell quickly and with multiple offers and overbids.

Willow Glen Real Estate Market Trends: Single Family Homes

Willow Glen home prices are up double digits from a year ago, but down a little from the month before. Inventory is rising, but so is the sale to list price ratio.  Buyers are not getting any relief yet, and sellers continue to see sold sales prices for their properties.

Click for the complete Willow Glen real estate report:

Trends At a GlanceMay 2024Previous MonthYear-over-Year
Median Price$2,100,000 (-4.3%)$2,195,000$1,727,500 (+21.6%)
Average Price$2,226,050 (-2.7%)$2,287,280$1,947,130 (+14.3%)
No. of Sales54 (+50.0%)3654 (0.0%)
Pending47 (+34.3%)3538 (+23.7%)
Active45 (+12.5%)4030 (+50.0%)
Sale vs. List Price108.5% (+0.4%)108.0%104.1% (+4.3%)
Days on Market14 (+28.2%)1117 (-16.3%)
Days of Inventory25 (-22.4%)3217 (+50.0%)

 

and a month earlier:

 

Trends At a GlanceApr 2024Previous MonthYear-over-Year
Median Price$2,195,000 (+9.2%)$2,010,000$1,975,000 (+11.1%)
Average Price$2,287,280 (+2.8%)$2,223,900$2,192,020 (+4.3%)
No. of Sales36 (-2.7%)3731 (+16.1%)
Pending35 (+9.4%)3238 (-7.9%)
Active40 (+53.8%)2648 (-16.7%)
Sale vs. List Price108.0% (+1.3%)106.7%103.3% (+4.6%)
Days on Market11 (-38.7%)1814 (-22.6%)
Days of Inventory32 (+52.8%)2145 (-28.2%)

 

 

Below please find a market profile and then a couple of charts for the Willow Glen real estate market for houses and duet homes (attached single family homes – not duplexes), care of Altos Research, to which I have a subscription. Altos uses list prices, not sold prices. The data is automatically updated each week, so please bookmark this post and come back often!


Data from Altos Research for Willow Glen Real Estate Market Trends – San Jose 95125

In the latest update, Altos says single family homes are in a strong seller’s market with rising market action, and a decrease in much needed, perpetually low inventory. As of today, 35% have taken price reductions.

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The Cambrian Park Real Estate Market Update

Cambrian Park Real Estate Market graphicThe Cambrian Park real estate market remains a strong seller’s market with prices continuing to rise.

For those new to the area, Cambrian is most of the 95124 zip code (south of Foxworthy) and most of 95118 (west of Almaden Expressway). It borders Los Gatos, Campbell, Willow Glen, and Blossom Valley.

The Cambrian Park Real Estate Market

The chart below is from our subscription to the RE Report. These numbers often line up closely with the ones that I pull directly from the MLS, but they are almost never exactly the same.  Many indicators show a market which is more and more challenging for buyers. The sale to list price ratio (well over 110%) came down just a little, though.

Trends At a GlanceMay 2024Previous MonthYear-over-Year
Median Price$1,938,000 (+1.7%)$1,905,000$1,676,000 (+15.6%)
Average Price$2,019,380 (+2.7%)$1,965,730$1,778,530 (+13.5%)
No. of Sales61 (+24.5%)4944 (+38.6%)
Pending34 (-22.7%)4448 (-29.2%)
Active32 (0.0%)3224 (+33.3%)
Sale vs. List Price111.8% (-1.8%)113.8%107.5% (+4.0%)
Days on Market(-3.3%)913 (-37.9%)
Days of Inventory16 (-16.9%)1916 (-3.8%)

 

The Cambrian market continues heating up. Check out the average sale price by month, including the partial month of June (so far).

 

Cambrian SFH Average sale price - Cambrian Park real estate market - San Jose

 

If this continues in May, it will be one of the highest priced months ever (second only to April 2022). Cambrian has a lot of enduring value that makes home buyers decide that it’s worth fighting to get a foothold there.

 

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Almaden Valley Real Estate Market Conditions

Almaden Valley Real Estate Market Conditions San Jose 95120 - photo with Mt Umunhum in backgroundThe Almaden Valley real estate market is experiencing some up and down, but remains clearly in a seller’s market and much stronger than it was one year ago. Inventory remains perpetually low, so the best homes in great locations are selling like hotcakes while buyers are passing over others that may need more work.

Almaden Valley Real Estate Market Conditions: Trends at a Glance

First, a look at the residential real estate market statistics for Almaden, or San Jose 95120 from the Real Estate Report (a subscription that uses closed / sold data).

Sales are coming up now that inventory is rising a little! Prices continue to rise both monthly and annually.

Trends At a GlanceMay 2024Previous MonthYear-over-Year
Median Price$2,422,440 (+4.1%)$2,327,500$2,176,350 (+11.3%)
Average Price$2,463,030 (+3.3%)$2,383,930$2,211,560 (+11.4%)
No. of Sales40 (+42.9%)2823 (+73.9%)
Pending20 (-33.3%)3029 (-31.0%)
Active27 (+3.8%)2622 (+22.7%)
Sale vs. List Price105.8% (-0.4%)106.2%102.3% (+3.4%)
Days on Market(-12.1%)1013 (-32.0%)
Days of Inventory20 (-24.8%)2729 (-29.4%)


Altos Research charts for Almaden Valley real estate market, single family homes segment
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Santa Clara County Real Estate Market

The Santa Clara County real estate market conditions were a little cooler in May with slightly longer days on market and slightly lower sales to list price ratio, but home prices rose just the same, breaking records.

  • Home prices hit a new high in May 2024 for Santa Clara County for both the average and median sale prices. The average was more than $2.44 million, and the median was in excess of $2.057 million!
  • Inventory is rising.
  • Days on market are up a hair monthly, but lower than a year ago.
  • The sale to list price cooled a little
  • Interest rates are up and we are hearing of a shift to a cooler market, particularly for condos and townhomes (not so much for houses)

Numbers vary slightly between the RE Report and hand-pulled data from the MLS, but the trends are still clearly visible – it’s a hot market heading towards summer.

 

May 2024 sales stats in Santa Clara County

Here’s the RE Report summary table or TRENDS AT A GLANCE. It’s an excellent summary of our Silicon Valley housing market.

Santa Clara County Market Trends At A Glance

Real estate market statistics

 

Multi year real estate data charts for Santa Clara County real estate market (single family homes)

PLEASE NOTE: to view any of the data tables / images below in a larger version, just click on them and you will be taken to our blog post, where the images are larger (except for the first one). Still too small? Click on them in the article and a larger still version will pop up. 

Months of Inventory

First, the months of inventory, which points to a slight cooling in the market, again.

 

Santa Clara County months of inventory - single family homes

Inventory

Next, inventory – it is up quite a bit both month over month and year over year.

 

Santa Clara County inventory of houses for sale

 

Days to Sell

Days to sell – how fast are they flying off the market? It’s 14 days, shorter than the year before, but up a hair from April.
Santa Clara County average days to sell for houses

 

Average Sale Price

Average home sale prices hit a new high and have now bested the last peak. This is noteworthy! (Two months in a row.)

Santa Clara County average sale price of single family homes

 

Median Sale Price

The median sale price gives us the midpoint for sale prices – half are higher, half are lower. The median sale price hit a new all time high in May 2024 (after April’s all time high).

Santa Clara County median sale price for houses

 

Sale to List Price Ratio

The sale to list price ratio also has risen compared to the month and year before in May 2024.

SCC Sale price to list price ratio for single family homes

 

Average Price per Square Foot

The average price per SF slipped a bit, down from its all time high in April, but still well above a year earlier.

Average price per SF for single family homes in SCC

 

Number of Sales

The number of sales is up, thanks to an increase in inventory.

Number of home sales in Santa Clara Co - houses or SFH

 

RE Report data by city or town for single family homes


Re Report table from our PDF for houses, city by city

 

RE Report commentary for single family homes in Santa Clara County:

Home prices set new highs for the second month in a row.

The median sales price for single-family, re-sale homes was up 19.1% compared to last year. The median sales price was $2,100,000.

The average sales price for single-family, resale homes also set a new high for the second month in a row. It was up 15.4% year-over-year. The average sales price was $2,438,990.

Sales of single-family, re-sale homes were up 13.5%, year-over-year, in May. There were 851 homes sold in Santa Clara County last month. The monthly average since 2000 is 987.

The sales price to list price ratio fell from 110.7% to 109.2%.

Pending sales were up 13.1% year-overyear.

There are 700 homes in escrow. Inventory of single-family, re-sale homes was up for the first time in fourteenth months. It rose 19.1% compared to last year. As of June 5th, there were 743 homes for sale in Santa Clara County. The average since January 2000 is 2,703.

Days of Inventory, or how long it would take to sell all homes listed for sale at the current rate of sales, stayed at 26 days. The average since 2003 is 89. It took fourteen days to sell a home last month. That is the time from when a home is listed for sale to when it goes into contract.

 

RE Report data by city or town for condos and townhomes

Re Report table from our PDF for condos and townhomes, city by city

 

RE Report commentary for condos and townhomes in Santa Clara County:

Condo prices also set new highs last month. The median sales price for condos was up 12.7% compared to last May. The median sales price was $1,081,500. The average sales price gained 10.2% year-over-year. The average sales price was $1,144,730.

Condo sales were up 31.4%. There were 268 condos sold in May.

The sales price to list price ratio fell from 106.4% to 105.3%.

Condo inventory was up 88% compared to last May.

As of June 5th, there were 406 condos for sale in Santa Clara County. The average since January 2000 is 757.

Days of inventory rose from thirty to thirty-three.

It took an average of fifteen days to sell a condo last month.

 

Santa Clara County Real Estate Market – What we’re seeing & hearing

This is a busy time of year with graduations and weddings, and most years things slow down in May as the Spring rush mellows. That’s what we are seeing, also, though it seems to be more the condo market than the single family home market that’s cooling..

  • We recently got some condo buyers into contract on a cute place in Campbell. There were no other offers.
  • Clair and I have been showing homes to other buyers, and we are happy for them that the market conditions are better for buying than they have been in a while.
  • The high interest rates remain a huge problem for many home buyers.
  • Our Almaden listing is still in the getting ready stages – should be on sometime this summer.
  • There are more and more real estate scams being levelled at real estate professionals. I’m now getting them at least once a week. A scam always starts with a text or email and says something slightly off, like “I’m Lisa. I saw you on Zillow. Can you help me to buy a house?” Or “My boss found you on the internet. Can you help him to buy a house?” For any of you reaching out to a Realtor initially, please be aware of this so you come across as authentic and get taken seriously!
    • If a home buyer reaches out to a real estate agent, it’s good to be transparent, give your whole name, why you are reaching out to them, and be specific so that you don’t sound like a bot or scam. When we get an email saying “my friend at XYZ company, John Jones, said you helped them to buy a townhouse in Cupertino and I’m in the market to buy there. Can we chat?”  I know that they are for real and I will respond right away. It’s also helpful if you use an email address like SallySmith@Email.net rather than AjaxTheWarrior@iSmashRocks.com or a gobbledygook email address.
    • Do not ask to continue the conversation on Instagram or WhatsApp if you are just getting to know your agent. Those are always scams.

Interested in selling or buying here in Santa Clara County, or nearby? Please reach out to us! Email is the best first contact: mary@popehandy.com.

 

 

The real estate market in San Jose’s Blossom Valley area

Pan of Santa Teresa and Blossom Valley

Pan of Santa Teresa and Blossom Valley

The Blossom Valley real estate market heated up through the first quarter of 2024 and are even hotter in spring. It continues to be a strong seller’s market! Homes in good shape which are priced appropriately regularly sell quickly and well above list price, despite new hurdles for buyers to overcome over the last two years. While trends can vary based on price point, schools, zip codes, etc., the entire area is still in high demand.

Here are some bullet points from the latest statistics:

  • Closed sales are well above this time last year, as is pending, while active inventory is just a hair more
  • The average sale to list price ratio also grew month-over-mont and soared above last year!
  • Days on market sped to a red hot turnover with an 8 day average with a slightly slower market absorption (days of inventory) at just 13 days

Often we see month-over-month softening into the end of the year with lower inventory and demand over the busy holiday season, followed by an increase in activity (and rising prices) as the market moves towards spring. That said, the market remained strong through winter and began experiencing rapidly increasing activity earlier than usual. March and April are often the peak months for pricing, and it’s definitely a hot market in Blossom Valley!

About Blossom Valley

The Blossom Valley area of San Jose is on the south end of the city and covers the 95123 and 95136 zip codes. For our MLS, it’s “area 12.” A more affordable section of Silicon Valley, it has much to offer in addition to more reasonable housing prices. Many areas enjoy views of the Santa Teresa Foothills or the Communications Hill knolls or even the coastal foothills in the distance and Mt Umunhum. One corner of it sits alongside beautiful Almaden Lake, too. Another corner is located at the crossroads of Highways 85 and 87, making it an easy commute destination for those working in downtown San Jose. And there’s an abundance of shopping and dining opportunities.

Now for some market data.

Live Altos Reports

We’ll start with the Altos Reports, which gague the market based on active listings, not sales, and is updated about once per week.

95123 real estate market trends, automatically updated weekly:

Blossom Valley Real-Time Market Profile by Altos Research

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Introducing the Cambrian Gardens Neighborhood of San Jose

The Cambrian Gardens neighborhood is situated close to the Los Gatos border and is one of the more affordable Cambrian neighborhoods, particularly if home buyers are looking with schools in mind first and foremost.

It enjoys lovely views of the hills, great public schools with strong test scores (and other metrics), a neighborhood private school to boot, and convenient access to freeways and stores. There’s no sign, marker or gateway to the area, so many of its residents are probably unaware that the official name to it is Cambrian Gardens.

This area in Cambrian Park provides an incredible “bang for the buck” for home buyers wanting excellent schools and not wanting to pay luxury home pricing. In many ways, it’s a “sleeper” – meaning that many people don’t know it’s there, but it’s a relatively good deal!

Where is the Cambrian Gardens neighborhood of Cambrian?

 

Map of the Cambrian Gardens neighborhood in San Jose 95124The rough borders are Union Avenue, Los Gatos-Almaden Road, Leigh Avenue, and the West Valley Freeway (85).

Not everything within that area is part of the tracts which make up Cambrian Gardens, though. It was developed just south of and directly adjacent to the Cambrian Park area which is so well known, but now separated from it by the freeway. (Click image or here to see live map in Google.)

Cambrian Garden Landmarks

Homes built in this part of Silicon Valley were clustered around the later-built neighborhood public school (bordered by Clarinda, Laurinda, Emeline and Sandy), James De Voss, which is now leased out as a private one, the Global School, as well as Little Oak Preschool. The other major landmark to the neighborhood is Ross Creek, which slides through the middle. With it come frogs, egrets, ducks and other wildlife which are generally welcome. (more…)

How to get a great buyer’s agent – and keep them

You and your great buyer's agent teamwork graphic - puzzle pieces and 2 peopleA great buyer’s agent can be hard to find and keep. Here’s what to do to enlist the help of one and how to make sure you stick together as a team and get you into your new home.

Summary:

Only a fraction of all interested home buyers actually buy in the year they say that they plan to do so.  For various reasons they decide to keep renting, or move away, or give up, or simply don’t write offers that are selected (they may chronically low-ball)

  • Some home buyers are very serious but also very time consuming, and if it takes them a long time to buy, it can be draining for their real estate agent, and if prices are rising, it can shrink the odds of success.
  • Many Realtors prefer to work with sellers when the market is hot – which it nearly always is in Silicon Valley, since most homes do sell (while far fewer buyers buy).
  • Buyers who want to enlist a strong Realtor will need to be serious about home buying, able and ready (have the money and a pre-approval in place), and loyal as the starting point.  Your real estate licensee may ask you to sign a buyer representation agreement, just as home sellers sign a listing contract. This will be required by law by mid-July 2024.
  • To be taken seriously, when you first contact your agent, DO:
    • share your full name
    • share your real contact info (including an email address that you actually check)
    • specifically what you are targeting
    • how you got their name
    • your timing and anything else important
  • Understand that we agents get many scammers approaching us. Do your best to look authentic. Scammers say “I want to buy a house in your area. Contact me on WhatsApp”.  If you sound like a scammer, your initial approach may backfire so badly that your message gets you blocked in the future. (I get several scammers texting me each week.)
  • If for any reason you haven’t done all of the above upfront, please correct it if needed over time. For instance, if you provided a “junk” email account and never check it, your agent may find your perfect home but not be able to inform you of it if you never look at those emails.
  • To keep your great buyer’s agent on your team, it’s imperative that you allow that Realtor to guide you, whether it’s getting preapproved with a strong lender, deciding on priorities (must have versus nice-to-have list), or moving quickly to view houses, or taking the paperwork seriously – or any other major step. You need to be as motivated as your agent!
    And communicate openly if there’s an issue. I’ve had clients tell me that the pre-approval needs to wait until they’ve been at their new job until a certain date. Whatever it is, ignoring requests given to help you without explaining the backstory won’t be good for your teamwork and could get you fired as a client. (Yes, Realtors sometimes fire their clients.)

    • If you fail to do these things, your agent may not feel like your odds of buying a house are good, or that the stress associated with doing so will be higher than necessary if you stall on taking the proper steps.
    • Put another way, if you hire an agent because of her or his knowledge and track record, but then don’t heed that agent’s professional advice, the relationship may not do well over the long run.  Think of it like a sack race: both people have to be going in the same direction, carefully working together, or it’s not possible to move well (if at all).

Below, we will go over in more detail how to get and keep a great buyer’s agent in a seller’s market or in any market, for that matter.

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What makes an offer lowball?

Lowball offer - baseball with the word LOWBALL imposed over it - what makes an offer lowball?Silicon Valley real estate offers few simple answers but many recurring questions. One of them is whether or not you should write a “lowball offer“. So the first question is this: what makes an offer lowball?

What makes an offer lowball?

In general, contracts with prices more than 10% lower than list price will be considered low at best, and insulting at worst, but there are many nuances, and this may not always be the case.

  • What is typical for the area? If most properties are being sold at 10% lower than list price, then 11% or 12% won’t be viewed too dimly if the home has been on the market for a while.
  • How long has this piece of real estate been listed for sale? What might seem low in the first week might look OK after 3 weeks.

What’s the immediate market climate like there?

What makes an offer lowball is above all related to what is happening in that precise micro market. It’s entirely relative to how the market in that area (not the county, not the state, but that particular area) is selling.

If houses in one area of San Jose are selling within plus or minus 1% of list price and you come in 5% under, the seller may feel that your offer was not in good faith, that the offer is insulting, or you are not a serious buyer who takes the opportunity to buy seriously.
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Multiple offers are common right now in Silicon Valley

Multiple offers are common - sellers and listing agent discussing the open house and biddingMultiple offers are common right now in the Silicon Valley real estate market. With them typically come overbids and sky high sales prices. Clair and I have shown several homes that our buyers did not bid on but which got many offer contracts and which sold for 15 – 20% over list price just over the last 30 days or so.

The hottest part of the market seems to be properties under $2 or $3 million, depending on the area.

When there are tons of buyers lining up to purchase a home, the sellers have usually put a substantial amount of time, energy, and money into making their property look fantastic, and they also take a risk in pricing it low to attract a large number of home buyers.

Multiple offers are common when property sells fast – but it doesn’t always!

When there aren’t multiple offers, it could be location issues, condition of the property (or neighborhood), overpricing (the most common culprit), difficulty in viewing the home, or other missteps on the selling side.  Buyers today want a turnkey home in a superior location that’s in great shape – not remodeled 20 years ago or more – and they will pay a premium price for it.

When homes have been on the market for 3 weeks or more, this may be a great opportunity for buyers to be the lone bidder on it. Does it have the right things wrong? Can what is off be fixed? Is it only overpriced? I would suggest buyers focusing on all of the inventory and not just the hot new inventory.

Why is it that multiple offers are common now?

There are a couple of reasons why homes that are in great shape, priced low, and given good exposure to the market are selling so strongly now.

  • First, there is a dire shortage of inventory, or lack of supply.  This is a chronic problem, but it’s acutely so now due to the higher interest rates and home owners not wanting to sell. It’s unlikely for this to change anytime soon, unfortunately.
  • Second, because Silicon Valley residential real estate has a long track record with good appreciation, those who can buy want to do so. Many are empowered by the rising stock market. If they are here for the long haul, buying makes more sense than renting.
    • Many are purchasing with more than 20% down, and they will watch for an opportunity to refinance.
    • Others are buying all cash. Those buyers may be anywhere from 15% to 35 % of the successful home buyers.

The inventory crisis will likely improve a little as the year goes on because inventory normally rises with the peak being somewhere in the summer most years.  No guarantee – sometimes it doesn’t behave “as usual”.

How can you tell if a home is going to get multiple offers or what the selling price will be?

These are really two different, but related, questions.
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Why do you keep losing out on multiple offers?

A crowd running to an open house - many of these losing out on multiple offers

Multiple Offers

Are you losing out on multiple offers? If it’s happened repeatedly, you may be hoping for a lucky break. But luck usually has nothing to do with success.

The real estate market in Silicon Valley is a hot seller’s market, and that means that often there are multiple offers, overbids, and sales with no contingencies. This is often the case with homes that sell in 2 weeks or less. Some buyers may get it on the first attempt, but many are bidding over and over – why do they keep losing out on multiple offers?

Over the course of my career, I have noticed that often there is a consistent “spread” of offers.  Most of the time, there’s a pack or band of offers at about the same level, sometimes 10% or more over list price, then a couple higher that that, and maybe one or two (once in awhile 3) at the top of the heap in terms of both price and terms which are attractive to the seller.

(There’s a video with my commentary on this below.)

Not everyone is losing out on multiple offers: what are the winners doing?

  1. The top offer frequently has the highest price and best terms. They aren’t losing out on multiple offers because no one else was willing or able to write such a high, strong contract.
    • It is 10-20% over list price or more, 25-30% down at least, and has no contingencies for inspection, loan, and most of all, appraisal (the percentage over has to do with whether the home was priced spot on the value or strategically under). Please see the video below for more on these items.
    • The winning offer’s buyers and agent followed directions. Normally that means that they come with all disclosures signed, and the buyer’s agent has even done her or his Agent Visual Inspection Disclosure. They include the proof of funds (all needed) which prove that the buyer can absorb any appraisal shortfall and is prepared to do so.  Sometimes the listing agent asks for a particular contract to be used or a particular summary sheet to be filled out. The best agents do all of that. The 2nd tier offers often are incomplete – the listing agents may or may not circle back and ask about missing items, so it’s important to remember that you only get one chance to make a first impression.
  2. The best offer is also someone who’s been SURE that he or she or they wanted the home from the very beginning and looks ROCK SOLID. NO WAVERING, not a “last minute” offer. Any hesitation on your side will cause the seller to not feel good about your odds of closing the sale. Be consistently interested if you want the sale. A shaky looking buyer may not include their proof of funds. They don’t come across as certain about buying this property and need a few days to see the property again, or show it to their parents, or otherwise confirm the decision to buy. Their agent is not so thorough. If the TDS is not fully signed off, is the buyers’ agent trying to sneak a 3 day right of cancellation into the contract? The best buyer’s offer doesn’t look shaky – it looks dead set on buying the home and has done everything possible to convince the seller of their conviction and competence.
  3. The second best or next runner up is usually strong on terms (at least 25% down, few or no contingencies) but perhaps made an offer price a little under the top value.  Sometimes the next runner up has a good price and mostly good terms, but something is not quite as solid – they didn’t offer to put the deposit into the escrow account the next day, they didn’t check all the needed boxes in the offer, they have a contingency when all the competing bids have none..  If the offers are tied but one buyer has no contingencies and the other has any, that will be the tie-breaker.
  4. Middle of the pack is usually a combination of a price where the home should appraise, a solid down payment, and few or no contingencies. It may be a price that seems “reasonable”. Buyers may feel that it is “a fair offer” or a win-win. Often the fair offers aren’t good enough to take the prize in multiple offers. If you can project what most buyers think a home will be worth, maybe you might want to consider getting ahead of that pack and seeing where the pricing trajectory will take you. The folks in the middle of the pack are usually the ones, together at the bottom, who keep losing out on multiple offers. (They will say things like “we are cautious…)
  5. Bottom offers are under, at, or barely over list price, and include an appraisal contingency as well as others (one for loan or one for property condition). If there’s a rent back, they want their PITI covered.

If you  repeatedly find yourself losing out on multiple offers, try to see your own pattern in this spread.  Is there one thing, or perhaps are there two or more things, you’re just not ready to do?

 

 

What do multiple offers look like to the sellers when receiving an offer? Click to view our post on popehandy.com and take a look at a side by side offer comparison sample.

Why it is so hard

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